Official Website of the City of Pompano Beach
Waste Water Strategic Plan Objectives Dashboard
Strategic Plan Objective Target/Goal Status
Inspect 20 miles of wastewater lines per year 20 miles inspected
Rehabilitate 108 manholes per year 108 manholes Rehabbed
Key
At or exceeding benchmark goal
Progressing toward benchmark goal
Needs improvement to meet benchmark goal

Broward County FROG Program

FROG stands for Fats, Rags, Oils and Greases. One current challenge lift stations face are fats, rags, oils and greases which are disposed of into the City sewers; all of which can lead to back-up and wastewater spills. Rags are non-biodegradable items. Though all four can have a negative impact on the wastewater system, rag related problems have increased dramatically and have negative effects on lift station operations. Some household items that are considered "flushable" do not degrade in the system as stated. They 'clog' the inside of the pump, decreasing the pump's efficiency. Unchecked, they could completely stop a 100 horsepower pump! Pump failure and premature wear of the pump and motor are the result. The City spends each week hundreds of hours removing "flushable" items from the pumps.

Large user Broward County Wastewater treatment plant

The City of Pompano Beach does not have a waste water treatment plant, but Broward County's wastewater plant serves the Pompano Beach residents. To learn more about Broward County's water and waste water plant, please visit their website.

Pipes

The City has approximately 62 miles of force main pipes ranging from 2" to 42" in diameter. The wastewater in the force main is pumped to the North Broward County Regional Plant for treatment on Copan's Road. This video shows an 8" clay gravity main leaking at the joint in the before shot. Then a newly cured in place liner is installed inside the old clay pipe as shown in the after shot to stop the leaking.

Pump stations

A wastewater pump station or lift station takes the wastewater (sewage) that is collected by gravity pipes from homes and businesses and then pumps the waste to the wastewater treatment plant.

The City has 80 lift stations that are maintained by City of Pompano, of that 3 are owned by Lauderdale by the Sea. There are approximately 85 Private lift stations.

Relining program

The City lines waste water pipes and manholes in order to prevent infiltration and inflow into waste water pipes. Currently there are about 4300 wastewater manholes in the City.

Jet Vac program

The City regularly cleans wastewater pipes. In the photo you can see a Jet Vac truck at work

Waste water Frequently Asked Questions

Where does the wastewater go for treatment?

The City's wastewater goes from the individual homes and businesses to the Broward County North Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant for processing.

Do we still have septic tanks in the city?

Only a few locations within the City still have septic tanks.

What is a Wastewater lift station?

A wastewater lift station takes the wastewater (sewage) that is collected by gravity pipes from homes and businesses and then pumps the waste to the wastewater treatment plant.

How many lift stations does the city have and how many are private?

80 lift stations are maintained by City of Pompano, of that 2 are owned by Lauderdale by the Sea. There are approximately 85 Private lift stations. About half of them are located on A1A, South Ocean Blvd and the other half located West of the Intracoastal Waterway.

Wastewater transmission:

  • We have approximately 62 miles of force main pipes ranging from 2" to 42" in diameter.
  • The wastewater in the force main is pumped to the North Broward County Regional Plant for treatment on Copan's Road.
  • We have 17.0 MGD reserved capacity at the Regional Plant.

What happens when the lift station loses FPL power?

The city will provide power to its lift station either by a stationary generator or a portable type unit.

Will the generator the city brings to the lift station have my power restored?

No the generator is for the lift station only, but because the homeowner and the City lift station are both on the same FPL grid line, it may help your power getting restored a little faster.

Who do I call if the lift station alarm is going off?

Check the placard on the lift station and call the number, if no response, call the City.

What causes sewer gases in the home and whom do I call?

The causes of sewer gas (rotten egg smell) is created by the decomposition of waste materials. When the home's plumbing system is working properly, the naturally-occurring sewer gas is directed up and out of the building through a vent system, which exits through the roof. No sewer odor should be ever be present. If you suspect a sewer odor, its best to make sure all toilets or sinks P-traps are full of water. (A P-trap is a plumbing fixture that stops sewer gases from passing into the home). Sometimes if not used regularly, the water in the P-trap may have evaporated thus causing sewer gases to enter the home. If the odor persist, a qualified plumber should be contacted.

Who is responsible for the private lift station maintenance?

The property owner is required to maintain the lift station through a private contractor.

Who is responsible for the private piping?

The property owner.

Will the city provide a generator for my private lift station?

No, the property owner of a private contractor should.

Why are City of Pompano Beach trucks in the Lauderdale by the Sea (LBTS) area?

The city has a contract with the town of LBTS on equipment usage.

What happens if there is a wastewater spill?

The city is required to notify the proper authorities of the problem and quantity and proceed to clean up the spill and perform environmental testing. If the lift station is privately owned the City will charge the lift station owner for the repair and clean up.

What does the city do during and after a hurricane?

The City stages emergency equipment and secures the equipment in the field. After a hurricane we access the damages and deploy generators as needed at various locations until FPL restores power. This is done 24/7 until power is restored.

Are there any locations in the U.S. that treat wastewater and turn it into drinking water?

Yes, the state of California (Orange County Water District) and Big Springs in Texas is another example. There are also some countries such as Singapore that are doing this. Namibia's capital, Windhoek (among the most arid places in Africa), practices 'direct potable reuse' on a large scale with recycled water going directly into the tap water distribution system.